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Today, May 7, 2011, the Canadian scientist Willard Sterling Boyle commemorates the Nobel Prize for detecting charge-coupled device (CCD).Information: Ramesh, Assistant Professor of Physics, Nehru Memorial College, puthanampatti, Trichy.






Today, May 7, 2011, the Canadian scientist Willard Sterling Boyle commemorates the Nobel Prize for detecting charge-coupled device (CCD).Information: Ramesh, Assistant Professor of Physics, Nehru Memorial College, puthanampatti, Trichy.

Willard Sterling Boyle was born on August 19, 1924 in Amherst, Nova Scotia, Canada. When he was three, he moved to Quebec with his parents. She was educated at home by her mother until she was 14, and then attended high school in Lower Canada College in Montreal. She later attended McGill University in Canada. But after graduating in 1943, he joined the Royal Canadian Navy (Royal Canadian Navy) during World War II. He was later transferred to the British Royal Navy where he was a Spitfire airliner aboard an aircraft carrier. He earned a bachelor's degree in science in 1947, a master's degree in science in 1948, and a doctorate from McGill University in 1950.



After graduating with a doctorate in Boyle, he worked at Canada's Radiation Lab. He then studied physics for two years at the Royal Military College of Canada. In 1953, Boyle joined Bell Labs, where in 1962 he and Don Nelson invented the still-visible red ruby. He was named in the first patent on semiconductor photocopiers. He was later named director of the Space Science and Exploratory Studies Department, part of Bell comm, a company under Bell Laboratory. Apollo later assisted with the space program, particularly in the selection of landing sites on the Moon. He returned to Bell Laboratory in 1964 and participated in the development of the microbiome.

In 1969, Boy and Zarczu eCam invented a charge-coupled device, CCD. The two received the Stuart Ballantine Medal in 1973 from the Franklin Institute and the Stuart Ballantine Medal. He won the IEEE Morris N. Liebmann Memorial Award in 1974, the Charles Stark Draper Prize in 2006, and the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physics. Boyle served as executive director of the Bell Labs Laboratory from 1975 until his retirement in 1979. After his retirement, he settled in Wallace, Nova Scotia, Nova Scotia, Canada. There, along with his wife, he started an art gallery to help. Nobel prize-winning Canadian scientist Willard Sterling Boyle left his world on May 7, 2011 at the age of 86, in the state of Nova Scotia.



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